Why bold policies for family planning are needed now

Potts M, Weinrib R, Campbell M.
Contraception. 2013 Apr;87(4):393-5. doi: 10.1016/j.contraception.2013.01.001. Epub 2013 Jan 9.
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23410716

Excerpt

The philosophy that the most transformative thing we can do is to give people access to family planning is also a philosophy of listening to what women want, not telling them what to do. It is lowering the TFR in a human rights framework. It is offering voluntary family planning even in low-resource settings where reducing average family size is one prerequisite for development. It is an important shift away from some of the misleading assertions made by advocates after the 1994 Cairo Conference that “fertility decline was a consequence of the developmental process and not a catalyst, and that the only way to insure its occurrence was by the indirect route of prompting development.” This belief, which is still influential among some economists and some women’s advocacy groups, is unrealistic and counterproductive as the example the Sahel demonstrates.